Individual Psychotherapy

People often think the right moment to start therapy is when they are in pain. Existential, interpersonal – whatever its origin, pain is what usually brings people to therapy. Naturally – therapy is a great way for us to heal and grow. BUT/AND 🙂 ➝
None of us has an algorithm for figuring life out – all by ourselves. Inevitably, there are moments we all need support simply because we are confused or feel lost, we’re facing a new situation, or life throws us a curve ball. It doesn’t have to be because something traumatic happened. Life in its complexity is, at times, plenty enough.

Whatever your situation, if you want to have a clearer sense of who you are and why certain things happen or keep repeating, psychotherapy might be a good choice. 

When in therapy you’ll learn how to feel more at peace and more comfortable in your skin. How to build satisfying and nourishing relationships – with yourself and with others. 

You will learn how to suffer less and how to make mindful choices that translate into life that’s meaningful.

You will also feel encouraged to connect the dots between your past and your present, the very process of which brings more understanding and peace into your life.

You might also find and start embracing your creativity in all aspects of life.

Psychotherapy is an art that is deep-rooted in science. We constantly update our knowledge based on what we learn from psychological research and the newest discoveries in neuroscience. That knowledge is then applied into creating a safe space where all the growth and change can happen.

Individual psychotherapy is a method of treatment – tailor-made for anyone undergoing it.  

To sum it up, psychotherapy is not only about relieving any symptoms you might have – in reality it’s more of a journey. It definitely is not a fixed recipe for success and happiness. 

One of the tools you’ll learn during the therapy is mindful curiosity about yourself and the world around you. That in itself is a powerful perspective that opens up what might have been shut down before.

It’s a practice that helps you look at yourself and the world around you and reflect; explore your thoughts and feelings, behaviors and needs.

It’s about experiencing life in a deeper more intentional way.

Some of the topics that bring people to my practice:

  • depression and anxiety,
  • trauma (an incident, death, traumatic childhood, other traumatizing circumstances),
  • difficulties with setting boundaries,
  • interpersonal problems (maintaining a healthy relationship, friendships, relationships with parents – no matter the age),
  • burnout,
  • personality disorders,
  • psychosomatic disorders,
  • topics around gender and sexual orientation,
  • expat-related issues,
  • confidence, self-esteem and self-worth issues,
  • spiritual or existential crisis,
  • grief, loss.